1955 Chevrolet 210 Wagon For Sale

1955 Chevrolet 210 Wagon For Sale

More Information Here: https://www.smokymountaintraders.com/cars-for-sale/510/1955-chevrolet-210-wagon ere we have a 1955 Chevrolet Wagon for sale. This Chevy is a Four Door factory V8 wagon that feature the correct 265 V8 engine and is an excellent cruiser. When you walk around it you can see that the body is in great condition and all appears to be solid. It's done in the two tone Seamist Green and White color combination that does a beautiful job of showing off the iconic design of the '55. All of the chrome and stainless on this Chevy is in great condition. It shows some light aging but is very presentable for a car that's cruiser ready. If we can help you in any way with questions or a specific picture, you can call our office at (865)988-8088. Or feel free to call Devvin at (865) 256 2366, or you can e-mail us at Sales@SMTClassics.com

The 1955 Chevrolet was offered in three basic trim levels consisting of the 150, the 210, and the BelAir. The 150 was aimed at economy and fleet buyers such as taxi cabs and police vehicles. The 210 and Bel Air were marketed towards families, with the Belair having a higher level of chrome trim, flair and interior appointments.

Chevrolet introduced the 210 (a.k.a. Two-Ten) in 1953 and it would remain in production through 1957. The production series number was 2100 and in keeping with growing trends towards numerical designation for models, Chevrolet shortened it to '210.' The 210 replaced the Styleline DeLuxe model of 1952 and was replaced after the 1957 model year by the Biscayne.

1955 was the first year of the' small block' V8 engine, along with a new chassis, new design, a ball-joint front suspension, Ball-Race steering, high-level ventilation, Hotchkiss drive, tubeless tires, and 11-inch drum brakes. Other new features included an Anti-Dive braking system, suspended brake and clutch pedals, and push-button door handles.

The overhead-valve V-8 engine was the company's first V-8 since 1918, and it had a compact design, a cast-iron block and head, hydraulic valve lifters, five main bearings, 265 cubic-inch displacement, and a Rochester two-barrel carburetor. It developed 162 horsepower and 257 lb-ft of torque or 260 horsepower and 180 lb-ft of torque when installed with a Rochester four-barrel carburetor setup. The standard engine was a six-cylinder unit with a 235.5 cubic-inch displacement, four main bearings, solid valve lifters, 7.5:1 compression, and a Rochester one-barrel carburetor. It developed 123 horsepower when paired with the manual transmission or 136 horsepower with the PowerGlide.

The styling was modern, clean and elegant with hood headlights, prominent bumpers, wraparound windshields, and 'Contour Cut' dips in the rear fenders or doors. Body styles on the 210 were the most extensive of the Chevy lineup, consisting of a 2- and 4-door sedan, club coupe, sport coupe, and a 2- and 4-door station wagon. Prices on the six-cylinder versions ranged from $1,640 to $2,230.

The One-Fifty had limited brightwork and a Chevrolet script on the front fender, chrome-plated bumpers, door handles, lamp rims, wheel hub center caps, hood ornament, and grille. The Two-Ten added a stainless steel windshield and backlight reveals. Additional exterior decoration included an upper beltline, sash moldings, and rear fender side. The interior received armrests, assist straps, a glove compartment light, ash receptacles, and a cigarette lighter.

The two-door sedan was priced at $1,775 and 249,105 examples were built. The four-door sedan listed for $1,820 and 317,724 units were built. The sport coupe was the most exclusive with 11,675 built at a base price of $1,960. The club coupe had 115,584 sales at a base price of $1,635. Of the two- and four-door station wagons, the four-door version (style 55-1062F; also known as the Handyman station wagon) was more popular with 62,303 units built with a base price of $2,130. 29,916 were the two-door versions (style 55-1063F; also known as a Townsman station wagon) with a base price of $2,080. When the V-8 engine was installed, the base price increased by approximately $100.

In 1954, Chevrolet introduced an optional trim level named the Delray on two-door models of its mid-range 210 series of cars. It was named after the Delray neighborhood of Detroit, Michigan. When Chevrolet discontinued its One-Fifty Series in 1958, the Delray became a distinct series and the new entry-level model. A four-door sedan and sedan delivery body styles were added to the lineup. 1958 was the only year the Delray was its own distinct series.

The total 786,307 units of Two-Ten vehicles built in 1955 represented approximately 46-percent of Chevrolet's total production.

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